rescue

rescue – [ res-kyoo ] – / ˈrɛs kyu / Verb (used with object), res·cued, res·cu·ing.

  • to free or deliver from confinement, violence, danger, or evil.
  • Law. to liberate or take by forcible or illegal means from lawful custody.

Noun

  • the act of rescuing.

Adjective

  • of or relating to someone or something trained or equipped to rescue: a rescue dog.

WORDS RELATED TO RESCUE
delivery, salvage, recovery, relief, preserve, protect, retrieve, liberate, extricate, keep, free, release, recover, recapture, ransom, saving, redemption, feat, reclamation, heroism

ORIGIN OF RESCUE
1300–50; (v.) Middle English rescuen < Old French rescourre, equivalent to re- re- + escourre to shake, drive out, remove < Latin excutere (ex- ex-1 + -cutere, combining form of quatere to shake); (noun) Middle English, derivative of the v.

SYNONYMS FOR RESCUE
liberate, release, save, redeem, ransom, extricate, recover.
liberation, deliverance, release, redemption, recovery.

OTHER WORDS FROM RESCUE

  • res·cu·a·ble, adjective
  • res·cue·less, adjective
  • res·cu·er, noun
  • non·res·cue, noun

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR RESCUE

  • He was killed by his captors during the U.S. rescue attempt in Yemen in December.
  • As night fell, the rescue operation slowed and sea conditions worsened.
  • It took 12 hours to rescue just 100 passengers overnight Sunday.
  • But the ships deployed already have been involved in the rescue of more than 1,000 people during their first month of operation.
  • And eight months on, anger lingers over the ineffective attempts to rescue the missing schoolgirls.
  • His mate broke into a laugh, but made no attempt to rescue him.
  • In an attempt at rescue, one man was killed, and three were seriously wounded.
  • Didn’t I rescue you from certain death with these two hands?
  • State socialism rescued them from the worst of that, and means to rescue them from all of it.
  • Our superior achievements—lifeboat, guns, the rescue from that reptile?
Posted in Letter Rr, Word of the Day.